For the latest instalment of ‘Humans of Project Trust’, we spoke to Returned Volunteer Micaela Church (Namibia 2014/15) about her work promoting ‘Global Citizenship’, and why it’s so important for young people to get involved.

“During my year overseas, I volunteered at Omaruru Primary School in Namibia, where I lived in the school hostel and cared for the children that lived there during the term. During the day, I taught the arts, PE and BIS (an information handling class) at the school, as well as running counselling and 1-2-1 English support sessions for some students.

“It was on my year overseas that I first discovered the idea of being a ‘Global Citizen’. Global Citizenship is about being a member of the global society; having an open mind to change and opportunities which will help on a local and global scale.

Humans of Project Trust: Micaela

In the playground, Micaela Church

“As soon as I returned from my year abroad, I knew I wanted to get involved in promoting Global Citizenship through Project Trust – this involves visiting schools to run awareness sessions on a variety of Global Citizenship-themed topics, as well as focusing on some global issues. I believe it not only helps make the world a fairer, more equal and understanding place, but it also gives pupils the confidence to learn about the wider world. It helps them think beyond their initial preconceptions, to learn about the reality of what life is like in other countries, or about how a particular global issue impacts our everyday lives.

“It’s easy for young people to start being Global Citizens in their everyday life. Every little thing helps, from making small changes to daily routines such as opting for a reusable water bottle to help tackle the global waste crisis, or including a new friend in a game which promotes equality and inclusion. You could even take it further by helping set up a debating team at school to discuss issues around the world, or joining a pen-pal initiative to learn about a new culture… the list goes on! Ultimately, it is about getting involved on a local scale with a global mindset.

Humans of Project Trust: Micaela

In the classroom, Micaela Church

“This year, Scotland is celebrating the Year of Young People. The year focuses on several themes around empowering young people, but for me the most important one is Education. In my Global Citizenship sessions, I always try to highlight how important it is for young people to learn about the world around them and to keep an open mind to possibilities, particularly when learning about another country which might do things differently to how we do them in the UK. If you build a strong understanding of your own country and what you can do to make it great, it will help you to broaden your perspectives of other places, cultures and issues.

“Spending a year working in Namibia with Project Trust gave me a much broader perspective and intuition about the world, making me feel comfortable in communities and environments very different to the one I grew up in. To any young people thinking about applying for Project Trust this year, I’d say: don’t hesitate, just do it! You’ll have the adventure of a lifetime.”

Humans of Project Trust: Micaela

“I always try to highlight how important it is for young people to learn about the world around them and to keep an open mind to possibilities…”

Humans of Project Trust: Micaela

“I always try to highlight how important it is for young people to learn about the world around them and to keep an open mind to possibilities…”

For the latest instalment of ‘Humans of Project Trust’, we spoke to Returned Volunteer Micaela Church (Namibia 2014/15) about her work promoting ‘Global Citizenship’, and why it’s so important for young people to get involved.

“During my year overseas, I volunteered at Omaruru Primary School in Namibia, where I lived in the school hostel and cared for the children that lived there during the term. During the day, I taught the arts, PE and BIS (an information handling class) at the school, as well as running counselling and 1-2-1 English support sessions for some students.

“It was on my year overseas that I first discovered the idea of being a ‘Global Citizen’. Global Citizenship is about being a member of the global society; having an open mind to change and opportunities which will help on a local and global scale.

Humans of Project Trust: Micaela

In the playground, Micaela Church

“As soon as I returned from my year abroad, I knew I wanted to get involved in promoting Global Citizenship through Project Trust – this involves visiting schools to run awareness sessions on a variety of Global Citizenship-themed topics, as well as focusing on some global issues. I believe it not only helps make the world a fairer, more equal and understanding place, but it also gives pupils the confidence to learn about the wider world. It helps them think beyond their initial preconceptions, to learn about the reality of what life is like in other countries, or about how a particular global issue impacts our everyday lives.

“It’s easy for young people to start being Global Citizens in their everyday life. Every little thing helps, from making small changes to daily routines such as opting for a reusable water bottle to help tackle the global waste crisis, or including a new friend in a game which promotes equality and inclusion. You could even take it further by helping set up a debating team at school to discuss issues around the world, or joining a pen-pal initiative to learn about a new culture… the list goes on! Ultimately, it is about getting involved on a local scale with a global mindset.

Humans of Project Trust: Micaela

In the classroom, Micaela Church

“This year, Scotland is celebrating the Year of Young People. The year focuses on several themes around empowering young people, but for me the most important one is Education. In my Global Citizenship sessions, I always try to highlight how important it is for young people to learn about the world around them and to keep an open mind to possibilities, particularly when learning about another country which might do things differently to how we do them in the UK. If you build a strong understanding of your own country and what you can do to make it great, it will help you to broaden your perspectives of other places, cultures and issues.

“Spending a year working in Namibia with Project Trust gave me a much broader perspective and intuition about the world, making me feel comfortable in communities and environments very different to the one I grew up in. To any young people thinking about applying for Project Trust this year, I’d say: don’t hesitate, just do it! You’ll have the adventure of a lifetime.”