Humans of Project Trust: #3 Bharavi

For our latest Humans of Project Trust, staff members Jordan and Lottie interviewed Bharavi, the well known and much loved Country Representative for India. Bharavi has been working with Project Trust for over fifteen years and has looked after hundreds of our India Volunteers, who he fondly refers to as his sons and daughters. In this interview, Bharavi talks about the importance of culture and the concept of being human.

“I’ve been with Project Trust for 15 years as Country Representative for India. Bharavi is my name – Bharavi was an old Sanskrit poet. My grandfather gave me this name. I’m not old – I’m 70 years young. I’m still going young.

Humans of Project Trust

Facetiming Bharavi…

“For 30 years, I worked as regional manager for a bank, taking care of up to fifty branches, and working all across India. I did well as a branch manager, but I didn’t like the job at all. Now, with Project Trust, I’m doing something I enjoy far more, and that is the most fortunate thing you can have. In life, you should do what you enjoy the most – I strongly believe that.  I strongly believe in that. My wife and I do a lot of things that we enjoy, and Project Trust is one of those things. That’s how I am now.

“Project Trust has a family background – we consider that you are human and I am human. That is the end of it – no further detail required. We are all human beings in different situations – different weather, culture, atmosphere. But the relationships, the emotions – they’re all the same.

“Project Trust is non-religious, non-political and very much human, from what I’ve seen. When you work with youngsters you’ll always be young. It’s such a nice opportunity that we get in life – working with young people. It’s nice to have them in our homes – we learn so much from them.

Humans of Project Trust

Bharavi and his wife, Sugathi on Hogh Beach, Isle of Coll

“Some of my Returned Volunteers are now doctors; some are parents, one works for ITV, and another works in an embassy. When I went back to the UK last year, I received an invitation to stay with one. They said, ‘Bharavi, I’m now married! I have a husband. I have a home. Come and stay with me the way I stayed with you.’ It’s wonderful – I still call all the Volunteers that I have looked after my children, although since about 2016 they’re now all my grandchildren. I think it’s one of the reasons I feel so young in my mind and my body – working with young people. It’s an inspiration to continue working for Project Trust.

“From a distance, Project Trust is all about youngsters coming to live overseas. But it’s also much more than that. Living somewhere for a year is very powerful. That’s a unique part of Project Trust – you get to experience a whole different life for a year. Do you know the concept of Global Citizenship? That is very much happening. We are Hindus, Christians, Muslims… and we are all human. That is Project Trust in one word – human. More and more friendships will grow that way – we have been doing it for fifty years and I hope we keep going for another fifty. There’s a quote in my email signatures that my Volunteers will be familiar with: ‘let us come closer together.’ That’s my advice to the Project Trust community.

Humans of Project Trust

Bharavi and Sugathi enjoying Hebridean hospitality

“There is no good culture or bad culture – just a different culture. You may like it or you may not – but that’s a different thing, that’s about individual perception. And with Project Trust, you have a great opportunity to go and see these new cultures and explore new places – it’s wonderful.”

Humans of Project Trust: TBharavi

“There is no good culture or bad culture – just a different culture. “

Humans of Project Trust: TBharavi

“There is no good culture or bad culture – just a different culture. “

For our latest Humans of Project Trust, staff members Jordan and Lottie interviewed Bharavi, the well known and much loved Country Representative for India. Bharavi has been working with Project Trust for over fifteen years and has looked after hundreds of our India Volunteers, who he fondly refers to as his sons and daughters. In this interview, Bharavi talks about the importance of culture and the concept of being human.

“I’ve been with Project Trust for 15 years as Country Representative for India. Bharavi is my name – Bharavi was an old Sanskrit poet. My grandfather gave me this name. I’m not old – I’m 70 years young. I’m still going young.

Humans of Project Trust

Facetiming Bharavi…

“For 30 years, I worked as regional manager for a bank, taking care of up to fifty branches, and working all across India. I did well as a branch manager, but I didn’t like the job at all. Now, with Project Trust, I’m doing something I enjoy far more, and that is the most fortunate thing you can have. In life, you should do what you enjoy the most – I strongly believe that.  I strongly believe in that. My wife and I do a lot of things that we enjoy, and Project Trust is one of those things. That’s how I am now.

“Project Trust has a family background – we consider that you are human and I am human. That is the end of it – no further detail required. We are all human beings in different situations – different weather, culture, atmosphere. But the relationships, the emotions – they’re all the same.

“Project Trust is non-religious, non-political and very much human, from what I’ve seen. When you work with youngsters you’ll always be young. It’s such a nice opportunity that we get in life – working with young people. It’s nice to have them in our homes – we learn so much from them.

Humans of Project Trust

Bharavi and his wife, Sugathi on Hogh Beach, Isle of Coll

“Some of my Returned Volunteers are now doctors; some are parents, one works for ITV, and another works in an embassy. When I went back to the UK last year, I received an invitation to stay with one. They said, ‘Bharavi, I’m now married! I have a husband. I have a home. Come and stay with me the way I stayed with you.’ It’s wonderful – I still call all the Volunteers that I have looked after my children, although since about 2016 they’re now all my grandchildren. I think it’s one of the reasons I feel so young in my mind and my body – working with young people. It’s an inspiration to continue working for Project Trust.

“From a distance, Project Trust is all about youngsters coming to live overseas. But it’s also much more than that. Living somewhere for a year is very powerful. That’s a unique part of Project Trust – you get to experience a whole different life for a year. Do you know the concept of Global Citizenship? That is very much happening. We are Hindus, Christians, Muslims… and we are all human. That is Project Trust in one word – human. More and more friendships will grow that way – we have been doing it for fifty years and I hope we keep going for another fifty. There’s a quote in my email signatures that my Volunteers will be familiar with: ‘let us come closer together.’ That’s my advice to the Project Trust community.

Humans of Project Trust

Bharavi and Sugathi enjoying Hebridean hospitality

“There is no good culture or bad culture – just a different culture. You may like it or you may not – but that’s a different thing, that’s about individual perception. And with Project Trust, you have a great opportunity to go and see these new cultures and explore new places – it’s wonderful.”